This time on the podcast Carl and Scott explore the depths and heights of videogame movies.

Movies:

  • The Super Mario Brothers (1993) An all-star cast including Bob Hoskins, John Leguizamo and the legendary Dennis Hopper can’t save this bizarre dark take on the normally cartoony and cherry world of Mushroom Kingdom
  • Resident Evil (2002) Milla Jovovich stars in a pretty standard and not particularly memorable action zombie shooter, that somewhat abandons its namesakes tense atmosphere.
  • Tron (1982) A stylish and interesting take on what was becoming a new media at the time, Tron takes on the world of the computer and video games with style and classic hollywood vintage. Shot on 65mm film, the scenes in the computer world were actually in black and white so they could be blown up and color painted onto animation cells.
  • The Wizard (1989) Fred Savage plays a kid who, with his little brother, sets off on a trip across the country, ending up at the Nintendo world championship to play the pre-release Super Mario Brothers 3.
  • Wreck it Ralph (2012) A fantastic movie in the long standing Disney/Pixar tradition, except in this case Pixar had nothing to do with it – well, John Lasseter was the executive producer, but this was all Disney Animation Studios. John C Reilly voices Ralph a disillusioned videogame baddie in a classic arcade game who reluctantly must team up with a racer from “Sugar Rush” Vanellope (Sarah Silverman) so he can, he hopes, win the respect of his peer sprites.

Games

  • Back to the Future (Telltale, 2010) A pretty dang competent point and click adventure, that takes Marty McFly on new adventures
  • Back to the Future (LJN toys, 1989) You play as Marty McFly in sick dreary NES game that mostly involves collecting alarm clocks off the streets of Mill Valley.
  • Jurassic Park (SEGA, 1993) Fight your way through the areas of the island as Dr. Grant, or as a Velociraptor.
  • Jurassic Park: The Game (Telltale, 2011) an interesting take on a game, but a bit difficult to enjoy the gameplay, as Telltale struggled to find a mechanic that was not as inline with its adventure game roots.

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